Todd Hido – ‘Bright Black World’

Bright Black World is Todd Hido’s response to Climate Change and the creeping blackness in our social and political landscape. Where previous books and bodies of work dealt with memory and nostalgia, Bright Black World is more present/future focused. It’s a small part Mad Max bleakness, part On Walden Pond lush stillness.

Ed Templeton – “Loose Shingles”

“Loose Shingles” is a B-Sides Box Set of outtakes, alternate takes, and other otherwise unpublished images from Ed Templeton’s archive. The B-Sides Box Sets are interesting things, sort of a cross between a portfolio of prints and a box of baseball cards. I’ve lumped them in to my “Photobook” category, but they’re really not books […]

Ed Templeton – “Hairdos of Defiance”

Back in High School, and for some time thereafter, off and on, I sported a sort of abbreviated version of Liberty Spikes, colored in a shade of purply-red called “Bodacious Burgundy.” The effect was somewhat subtle, alternating between preppy and mildly punk, just enough to get occasional looks of curiosity or disdain, but not enough […]

Luigi Ghirri – ‘It’s beautiful here, isn’t it…’

It’s beautiful here, isn’t it… was the first book published on Ghirri in the United States. It appeared in 2008, and I found my way to Ghirri in 2016, I think, maybe thanks to Teju Cole’s article in the New York Times Magazine, following an interview I heard with him on the Magic Hour podcast (and saved for later […]

Luigi Ghirri – ‘Kodachrome’ and ‘The Complete Essays 1973-1991’

By all rights, these two books should be reviewed separately. Sadly, though, they arrived in the same box and I unboxed them together, so here we are. Kodachrome is MACK’s 2013 reprint of Ghirri’s 1978 classic. From what I understand, it’s a facsimile of the original, albeit with the inclusion of a pamphlet containing a […]

Joel Meyerowitz – ‘Where I Find Myself’

What can I say about the first lifetime retrospective of Joel Meyerowitz’s work, with comments throughout by Meyerowitz himself? If you’re the least bit aware of Meyerowitz and his practice, you probably know something about his trajectory, from 35mm street shooter to 8×10 landscape and still life, and Where I Find Myself has it all.